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6 Stay-at-Home Jobs I’ve Done as a Stay-at-Home Parent

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6 Stay at home Pic 1

Being a stay-at-home parent is inarguably one of the most fulfilling and frustrating jobs on the planet. For one, you get to see your children grow and change — but to do this, you must sacrifice the perks of the working world, including the camaraderie of co-workers. Fortunately, staying at home doesn’t mean surrendering the most useful aspect of having a job: additional income.

Even after just a few weeks of doting on my first baby boy, I was itching to get back to work. Instead of abandoning him to daycare, I sought job solutions that would allow me to stay at home while completing projects and earning pay. Today, I am still satisfied as a stay-at-home mom, and I receive extra satisfaction from my stay-at-home job. For other stay-at-home parents interested in having your kids and working, too, here are seven easy, flexible jobs I’ve tried that helped me be both a proud parent and an excellent earner.

Daycare Provider

New parents have plenty of opportunities to connect with fellow new parents. During pregnancy classes, in doctor’s offices, and at baby classes (like music and swimming) I was able to cultivate a network of moms and dads who were going through the same situations I was. The difference was that most of them were planning on returning to work; fortunately for them and me, I wasn’t. Thus, I was able to start a small daycare among friends and earn a healthy income doing what I wanted to do as a new mother: take care of babies.

If you didn’t gain such a close-knit group during your pregnancy, you can still become a daycare provider. You can post fliers in your neighborhood to build awareness of your business, and you can even take in pets if you aren’t yet comfortable around others’ kids.

Crafter

Whenever I didn’t need to directly interact with my children, I usually had some sort of craft in hand. At first, crafting was simply a hobby I used as a creative time-waster, but eventually, I recognized that I could spin my diversion into another money-making scheme. With a few online stores and a spot in most of my city’s craft fairs, I was able to earn a sizeable chunk of change — and rid my house of all the crafting clutter.

Hundreds of hobbies translate well into small income generators: baking, sewing, woodworking, knitting, and more. However, before you can safely sell your goods, you should consider filing as a limited liability corporation, so you can protect you assets fully.

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Secret Shopper

As soon as my kids could walk, I knew I had to get out of the house. It didn’t matter where we went — as long as we were breathing fresh air. Fortunately, I was able to use my need for movement to bring in some cash. A handful of stores will pay shoppers to rate their in-store experiences. Now, secret shoppers can turn to apps containing lists of “missions” that make finding convenient, paying tasks a snap.

Tutor

When my kids started going to school, I quickly realized how much basic information I had forgotten. In order to be a better mom, I quickly enrolled in a handful of simple courses and bought textbooks to relearn all my lost knowledge.

Not only did that help me encourage my kids to succeed in class, but it allowed me to earn some side money as a tutor for other parents’ kids. Advertising with fliers at my kids’ schools — and eventually online on various tutoring websites — I accumulated a gaggle of well-paying tutees.

Salesperson

Eventually, my kids became teenagers, and the benefits of being a stay-at-home parent were fewer. Still, having been out of the regular work force for so long, I was reluctant to commit to a set schedule outside my home. Instead, I turned to sales. In the past, companies like Mary Kay Cosmetics and Tupperware allowed enterprising individuals to get a business up and running fast. Today, companies like this still exist, and with Web connections, the jobs are more flexible and fun than ever.

Freelancer or Consultant

I only recently turned to freelancing, and it is undoubtedly the most rewarding job I have ever had (besides being a mom, of course). It is as fulfilling as real work, as you work with clients and complete projects just like salaried positions — but you get the flexibility and authority of working for yourself. If you were successful in your field before your child or you have a wealth of specialized knowledge you are itching to put to use, freelancing or consulting is likely the best option.

Dad’s Health and Job Update

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I’ve got good news and bad news. Which do you want first?

Bad?

Good choice. Let’s just get it out of the way.

The trip my sister and I just took to be with my Dad for some scary appointments was met with mixed results. The specialist wasn’t convinced of the preliminary diagnosis my Dad had been given by another doctor. He’s scheduled appointments for additional tests and has ordered additional scans be done. My overwhelming feeling about this is disappointment. Although it does offer a sliver of hope, I feel in my gut and my heart that I know where this is headed and its not good. I wish we could have received a conclusive diagnosis and began to make some plans for the future. Without an official diagnosis, however, we’re stuck in a bit of a holding pattern. My sister and I have arranged for someone to accompany my father for his remaining tests and we plan to make a return trip when the diagnosis is officially being handed down. Not sure yet the exact time-frame for when this trip will take place, but certainly sometime this summer. On the bright side, my Dad did indeed give us money to reimburse the costs of the flight. I still incurred a few additional costs (e.g., I had to park at the airport instead of being dropped off due to the flight schedule, so I paid for airport parking and a couple of fast-food type meals while I was out of town). Nothing too major in the grand scheme of things. I’m certainly thankful that the largest expense (the $425 flight) was covered by my father. I would also be remiss if I didn’t take a moment to thank you all for your thoughts, prayers, and kind words in response to this family crisis we’re dealing with. Please keep those prayers and thoughts of strength and courage coming our way. This has been an incredibly stressful time, as I’m sure you can imagine.

Glad that’s out of the way.

Now, onto something good.

While I was out of town I received a call from the dean of the department where I just had an interview last week. It was so bizarre! In the voicemail message the dean literally said, “I’d like to meet and see if this will work so we can offer you the position.” So, I take this to mean that we’ll be discussing salary and job duties a bit more, but I’m officially being offered the position as long as we can come to terms. That’s very exciting news for me – my first full time job offer since graduating! I’m still very nervous about the salary negotiations given that the job was posted as DOE (salary depends on experience). I need to make enough money to make it worth my while emotionally and financially to move my daughters into full-time preschool (a huge transition psychologically and practically). I know this is such a random and broad question without additional background information – but what is the lowest amount you would accept if you were in my position? (or maybe a better question is – what salary would you try to negotiate for?) To give some more financial perspective, I think full-time preschool at our new childcare facility will run us about $1300ish/month. Also remember this isn’t just any random job – it’s advertised as only available for people with Ph.Ds. (so taking into consideration the extensive training – and accompanying student loan debt). Also, I’ve never given my precise salary but I’ll give you a range that I make between $30,000-$40,000 working part-time from home teaching my two online classes per semester (3 semesters in a year: fall, spring, and summer). That’s a LOT of money for working part-time. I tell you this to explain that I’m not going to accept an offer of $40,000 for a full-time job when I make nearly that much working from home part-time. Also, this job is not a tenure-track position, which means that if I accept it I’m basically taking myself out of the running for ever moving into that type of job position (limiting my future job options). I know every individual is different, every situation is different, and ultimately I just need to meet with the dean and discuss these concerns to see if I can get a salary offer that I feel comfortable with and that I think adequately compensates me for the work I’ll be doing. But I’d still love to hear your opinions on the matter and if there is a “magic number” you’d try to negotiate for given some of the parameters I’ve outlined above. Oh, by the way, my meeting with the dean is tomorrow (Friday)! So, yeah. Get me those suggestions asap! ; )

One final thing – I still haven’t heard back from the dean of the other department (remember I talked to the department head last Friday and was told the dean would likely contact me the beginning of this week. It’s now Thursday and….crickets over here). Should I reach out to the dean and/or department head and say that I’ve received a job offer from another department? This could help me in negotiations, right? And, honestly, I don’t know enough about the job parameters and responsibilities to know which job I’d prefer (since I’ve now talked with two department heads about two slightly different positions: one as lecturer/online program coordinator; the other as lecturer and academic adviser – though both jobs seem to have some fluidity of the responsibilities and could shift across time).

Lots of things to consider. Thanks for supporting me every step of the way with these two potentially HUGE life changes (e.g., Dad health issues and full-time employment opportunity).

Hugs to all you guys/gals!