:::: MENU ::::

Browsing posts in: Retirement

Retirement Planning

by

Let’s be real, if it weren’t for the mandatory retirement required by my employer (we’re required to contribute 7%, which is matched dollar-for-dollar by my employer!), I’d probably be a ways off from any serious retirement discussion. I mean, we should all be doing it, but when you’re just trying to pay your monthly bills, you’re probably not super concerned about how you’ll be paying for your golden years.

But we should be! Especially with some hints of BIG changes on the horizon!

First, did you see the IRS’ announcement with 2018 pension plan and 401(k) contribution limits? If not, check it out here. For the time being, annual income limits are going UP for traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, and Saver’s Credit! That’s good news to those in the stage of life to be maxing out retirement contributions!

The reason I use the verbiage here (“for the time being”) is that, right on the heels of the IRS’ announcement, talk from the Whitehouse is suggesting steep reductions in the annual limits allowed for tax-deferred retirement accounts. Check out this piece from the New York Times with more info. Some of these (rumored) reductions would be seriously dramatic.

Where are you in the retirement savings spectrum? Are you actively putting away money for retirement or still in full-on get-out-of-debt mode? I have mixed feelings about my work situation. I like that I’m being compelled to save 7% (+ the 7% employer match!), but I do wish I had the freedom to drop down my retirement contributions in an effort to get out of debt quicker!!!

I sure do hope that by the time I’m able to fully focus 100% on retirement that the investment vehicles to do so still exist! My Dad (before being diagnosed with FTD) was a financial advisor all his life. He has cautioned us for years that he felt Roth IRAs would eventually be taken away in their entirety (note – this is just his gut – no special “inside info” here). He’s urged us for years to get our financial houses in order and be in a position where we can max out our Roths since, in his view, they could end up disappearing soon!

 


Sustainability Should Be a Priority When Planning For Retirement

by

The local annuities market has grown over the last few years. At the same time, fewer individuals are opting for conventional life annuities, which is quite interesting since conventional life annuities are the only products that provide guaranteed returns for the rest of the retiree’s life. However, these products tend to be expensive (particularly ones that adjust for inflation) and income yields are low.

While some people are prepared for retirement, most are not saving enough. These retirees hope that the market will make up for any lack in capital and are opting for living annuities, which offer more flexibility and the potential to earn higher returns.

The real issue here is a lack of savings. If you find yourself in this category then don’t despair: Proper planning and rational investor behavior can help you manage the problem.

The key is planning

Investors need to examine their financial positions and speak frankly about their options long before they retire. This may be a painful exercise but will present you with more options and ultimately choices. Having as much information about where your funds are invested and what the best performing unit trusts are, help make these choices less daunting. Think about how much you have saved and how long you will need support yourself during retirement. The key risks most retirees face are outliving their money and inflation eroding their savings. Developing a plan will help you account for these risks. As our life expectancy continues to increase it is advisable that you limit your consumption during the early retirement years.

Facing the facts

A lot of capital is required to enjoy the same lifestyle after retirement. If you retire with less than you need you can offset it by drawing more income early on, but this is not sustainable. Spending too much after saving too little is guaranteed to end badly.

You can consider delaying your retirement a few years to save a bit more. It tends to be easier to extend your career rather than go back to work after retirement. This may not be the most attractive option available, but it allows you more time to save, less time to live off those savings and gives your capital more time to grow.

You should not underestimate the impact this extra time will have on your savings. Extending your career in your twilight years may not be that appealing, but it is a better option than having to survive on a low retirement income or running out of money too soon. While some factors may be out of our control we can at the very least influence the longevity of our savings.


Pages:12345