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Posts tagged with: lung cancer risk

Online School for the Rest of the Semester

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My grandmother has been safely ensconced and quarantined in her room at the assisted living facility. The twins continue their work and service activities as normal. And the littles and I are sticking close to home. (We are going to pack a picnic get out of the house for a bit tomorrow to go for a hike at one of our many local mountains.)

We continue to be in storm mode financially, saving income and deferring any non-essential purchases. Despite the plan for History Buff to buy a new to him car when Sea Cadet returned from Americorp, we have decided to put that off for the time being. (He’s been driving Sea Cadet’s car since last fall, after selling his car.) No reason to add additional car maintenance and insurance costs when my car is mostly sitting.

Unexpected Expense

I did have to purchase a new faucet and shut off valves for my bathroom as it sprung a leak and neither of the shut off valves work. Because nothing has been updated since this home was built 50+ years ago, my friend who helps with all my maintenance suggested this would be the best course of action. I know my landlord will reimburse me, but since he’s in his 80s I didn’t want to bother him at a time when he shouldn’t be out, so we are just taking care of it for now.

My Grandmother is Now Completely Isolated

The BAD community does not like how I have handled things with my youngest son or my Grandmother. While you may not believe it or see it, we took necessary precautions and had approval from the powers that be (ie doctors, my uncles and my mom) for my children to visit before she was tucked away for the foreseeable future.

I guess since we have been facing her cancer for almost months now and then complications from her surgery in January, we had long discussed that she and we wanted her to have quality of life, not quantity. We make the best decisions for our family. Just as you must do for yours. She will be quarantined to her room in the assisted living facility with no visitors allowed other than her healthcare staff. We will only be able to see her through the window.

We will have to agree to disagree on this, as I have no regrets about the quality time we had together. Nor do I regret letting my kids show her how much she is loved. If we are saying goodbye, this is how I (and she) wanted it. Gymnast will be absolutely broken when she goes. And to have denied him those final hugs and pictures and memories would have been the worst thing I could have done. I’m sorry if you disagree. (And this is not because of our fear of the COVID virus, but rather her being 92 and already in failing health.)

Clearing Up Confusion

With History Buff working at Home Depot and Sea Cadet being a first responder ie volunteer firefighter/EMT, I have little need to get out. So those that have commented on my “lalalala” and “bouncing around,” I don’t have to, my sons are out.

That being said, we have implemented stringent “coming home” procedures for them both to make sure they are not bringing anything home. We are also thoroughly cleaning our home on a daily basis. Most likely, we will be relaxing this a bit with our care for Grandmother being over.

We are well stocked for the long haul, are getting lots of outdoors time and doing our very best to make the best of what to me is a wonderful time with all my kids home. Since I’m a homebody and complete introvert, being home is where I shine.

I apologize that I don’t reply to EVERY comment, but I just don’t have the time to donate to the rants and criticisms all the time. But I do read them. And always appreciate the support. It’s hard to give you a full view of one’s life through a 300+ word essay. But I certainly appreciate those who can read through the lines and know that I would never intentionally put someone, especially those I love the most in any harm.

I hope you are all safe and enjoying this increased time with your family.

 

 

It Takes a Village

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Our fridge died last night, and I almost lost it.

We had just finished making dinner. I’d been in and out of the fridge for about 30 minutes, and everything seemed normal. But then my daughter opened it up and said, “Mom, the light isn’t working.” I thought, “Oh great, the bulb blew out.”

Oh girl, it was way worse than a burnt-out bulb.

The fridge had no power at all.

We troubleshooted. We flipped breakers, tested the outlet, and checked everything the user manual and the Internet recommended. Nothing worked. And we had a fridge and freezer full of our COVID-19 stockpile.

I texted a few friends and turned to Facebook to get a recommendation on a repair place. We got several good recommendations, but that small plea for help was answered tenfold. Within no time really, a neighbor had dropped off a mini-fridge they aren’t using. Another friend said they have an extra fridge/freezer on their back porch they emptied out for us. Our village really saved us (and our food).

Like many of you, it seems like the world is crumbling down around us. We’ve been humbled. We found out our 3-week business closure has now become 3 months due to an executive order from our governor. We’ve obviously paused our debt pay-off, and we’re very much in storm mode. We’ve applied for forbearance on student and business loans, forbearance on our mortgage, and all sorts of temporary assistance.

But even as the punches keep coming, I’ve been touched by all the kindness and generosity I’ve seen in our community.

Inspirational Message on Sidewalk

Here’s just some of the good our family has experienced the past few weeks:

  • A friend I haven’t talked to in years heard about our temporary business closure and sent us an Amazon gift card to use on our kids.
  • A dear friend from college mailed cookies to my daughter—who she has never met—because my daughter’s birthday is this weekend and my little one is disappointed we can’t leave home or have cousins over.
  • A non-profit kid’s after-school program our business has supported unexpectedly offered to drop off some birthday surprises for our daughter.
  • We were supposed to travel and see our nephew get married in April. They were able to get married yesterday instead in a really small, intimate ceremony with just their parents. We’ll celebrate with them later, but the local news did a little feature on them, so we still got to see video of some of the wedding.
  • We live on a small street, and we know a few of the neighbors really well, and the others hardly at all. But we’ve started a text group with all of the neighbors to check on each other, and it’s helped us grow closer as a little community.
  • One of my daughter’s teachers has been videoing herself reading books to help and connect with her students. All of my kids’ teachers have been emailing and checking in on all their students.
  • People have been writing positive affirmations and funny sayings on the sidewalks in our area. Others are putting teddy bears in their windows so kids can “go on a bear hunt” when they’re on walks.

A repairman is coming in a few hours to run diagnostics on our poor fridge. We’re praying for a good outcome. But if not, I’m calming myself with hope that our village is looking out for each other now more than ever.

What good have you seen in your community during this stressful time?

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