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Posts tagged with: investments

Under Contract

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We are now officially under contract!!!

Not hubs & I (we still haven’t even started house-hunting, but plan to start in August!! Can’t wait!!!) – my dad’s Utah house!

After receiving a couple competing offers, we accepted one that we felt was more than fair (it’s actually over our listed asking-price). We’ve already completed inspection and all the requested repairs are super minor, so we’re paying a handyman to get it all fixed up.

At this point, the last hurdles are in regard to the buyer’s financing. Our realtor has been in contact with the lender and believes the loan will be funded without a problem. Given that the buying price is above the list price (and above the comparables our realtor pulled), we’re holding our breath and crossing our fingers that the appraisal comes in high enough to cover it. Fortunately, our realtor is a rock star and has made up a whole list of home improvements for the inspector and feels confident that the appraisal shouldn’t be a problem.

If all works out with buyer’s financing, we are set to close on August 15th! Super pumped!

Initially, we were thinking we wouldn’t make too much off the sale of this home. Remember, both my siblings were in favor of renting it instead of selling due to this reason.

But given our higher-than-expected sale price, we should stand to net nearly $100,000!!! Not too shabby!

The next question is what to do with the money.

My dad does have a decent-sized net worth but, to date, we’ve done next-to-nothing with his investments. Everything is still in the original investment accounts he selected and has not been touched. We want to be somewhat conservative because my dad is legally disabled and will never be able to work again (if interested, read more about his condition here). His physicians have said that his illness tends to have a life expectancy of 2-20 years. If he lives another 20 years, he could easily burn through all of his savings. He’s already in assisted living and his care is incredibly expensive. So we really need to be smart and manage his money wisely so that costs of his care don’t end up falling on the shoulders of my siblings and me.

I’m a fan of pretty boring investment strategies. Mutual funds and such. My brother has talked about perhaps investing in real estate back in the Austin area (which makes it less complicated and risky than an out-of-state rental). He’s even thrown out the idea of establishing an LLC for a rental property so my dad’s other assets are protected. Depending on cost, we could possibly pay for a rental with liquid cash without needing to withdraw from current investments (the alternative would be putting a large amount down and taking out a small mortgage).

I’m open to various ideas, but I’m also a fan of EASY. Taking over my dad’s affairs has been incredibly time-consuming and, frankly, none of us has time for it. Meeting with an investment advisor once or twice a year is infinitely easier than dealing with rentals and such. That being said, in the past year that we’ve been in charge of my dad’s finances, his investments really haven’t performed great. He’s averaged about a 4% rate of return. I’d like to see closer to an 8-10% return, if at all possible. At only a 4% rate of return, we’re eventually going to eat into his nest egg. Fortunately, he had enough cash in the bank that we haven’t touched any investments at this point but eventually the liquid money will dry up and we’ll have no other option but to raid his investments in order to pay for his care.

What do you all think? If you were charged with caring for a parent’s estate, what types of investments might you make? What are your thoughts of investing in mutual funds versus investing in real estate?

Another possibility is to still invest in IRAs. My dad technically has an “earned income” because he received a generous severance package from his previous employer before having to leave due to his health issues (it’s paid out monthly for another year still). So would it be better to actually fund a retirement account versus buying mutual funds? Or is it better to keep the money more liquid than in retirement or real estate? Something like mutual funds that are easier to sell and claim the cash?? My dad is 60, by the way. I’d value any and all input you may have!


Long Term Planning

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I am really proud of ourselves! When 2014 began, I made a full list of “goals” (I prefer the word “goal” over “resolution”). This is a technique I actually learned from a career workshop I took a few years back, called “Career Mapping” (but I applied the same principles to all aspects of my life).

Basically, you think of your longer term goals (can be 10 year, 5 year, or 1 year). I started with 1-year goals in categories such as: financial, family/relationships, career, hobbies, etc. The idea is that you first come up with concrete “long term” goals. Then you “map out” your entire year by breaking up the big goals into smaller chunks. For me, I broke down the goals by month so every month I know a small, reasonable goal that I want to attain (with the idea being that all the small goals ultimately lead to fulfillment of the bigger, long-term goal).

Anyway, when I first did my 2014 Goals (Life Mapping, if you will), I did not think we would be able to pay off our credit cards by the end of the year. With about $1,000 per month for debt payments, coupled with $10,000 of credit card debt, plus additional other debts to account for, I thought it was an impossible goal. We would be close, but not quite out of credit card debt yet.

When I started blogging here (in March) I set the official goal date: March 2015.

And here we are….the beginning of June 2014. And I can officially say “We are credit card debt-free!!!!!!”

It’s a fantastic feeling!

But being me, I’m always looking ahead. I wish the credit cards were our biggest obstacle, but unfortunately, that’s just the tip of the debt iceberg. The cold, hard truth is that we still have over $100,000 of debt. About $95,000 of student loans, $22,000 of car loan, and $8,000 of medical debt (note, these are approximate numbers that are being rounded off….my last “official” debt update was here and I’ll do another one probably next week).

With this amount of debt, its difficult to put everything on “hold” until the debt is gone, because we’re looking at YEARS worth of repayment.

So I want to submit a question to readers: At what point do we begin long-term savings for retirement?

I know the Dave Ramsey school of thought is not to begin retirement savings until one is debt-free. However, there seems to be some ambiguity, because I’ve also heard (on the radio show) Dave tell people that if their debt repayment is going to take a significant amount of time (though what constitutes “significant” is not clearly defined), that they should not forego retirement savings for the entire time.

Currently we are 30 and 31, respectively, and have a reasonable EF (approx. $11,000), but no official “retirement” savings – no 401K, Roth IRA, etc.

This also begs the question of what constitutes an EF versus retirement. Some of our funds (about $6,000), which I have considered part of our “EF” is actually tied up in money market mutual funds. Although technically liquid, if we were to dip into it we would have to pay taxes on money made from their sale (dividends are currently reinvested) and my plan has been to NOT touch the money. Given these circumstances, wouldn’t this be better referenced as “retirement” funds as opposed to an emergency fund?

Right now I think we would like to keep up our Gazelle intensity with debt repayment. We need to knock down some of our debts so that once my school loan deferment period ends (February 2015), we will comfortably be able to make the huge payments. But at that point, I’ve always said I don’t feel the same “intensity” to eradicate the student loans as I have with our other debts. Would it be wise, at that point, to begin saving some toward retirement?

What percentages would you be putting toward retirement versus debt? Obviously, we’ll have minimum payment obligations so we’ll have to abide by that, but anything above minimums – would you put 50% toward retirement and 50% toward extra debt payments (as an example)??

I’m just trying to think these things through and come up with some sort of long-term “game plan” for what to do with our money.

Advice and suggestions welcome!


Investment Advice…

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I was reminded again this weekend about the need to invest in an incredibly valuable commodity…

My marriage.

I’ve talked about this investment in the past but haven’t mentioned it in a while.

In the book, The Millionaire Next Door, the author shares the importance of keeping a marriage together. Most millionaires stay married to the same person. A large reason they were able to stay millionaires is because divorce is EXPENSIVE.

Our neighbors announced their upcoming divorce this weekend. Unable to afford the house on their own, they will likely be forced to sell it. I’m sad to lose them as neighbors, and I’m sad at the loss of their marriage.

I know they didn’t wake up yesterday morning and decide they didn’t want to be together anymore. It was a long, slow separation.

No, I’m not stupid. I understand that not all divorces are preventable (and in cases of abuse, they are healthy) but I know I’m guilty of being lazy in my marriage sometimes and neglecting my poor spouse.

So I gave him an extra squeeze, snuggled near him on the couch while I read my book and he watched the sports show he loves so much, and told him how much I really love him.

Financial investments – important. Marriage investment – vital.


Debt Free? What comes next?

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As my debt free date grows closer, I find myself thinking about the next step. I’m about 6 months away and it’s an incredibly strange feeling. I have had some sort of debt since I bought my first car at 16. I’ve spent half my life paying someone back.

When my debt is reduced to only my mortgage payment, what will I do?!?

If you had asked me, when I first started this journey, what I would do when my debts were paid, I would have said, “I want to remodel my 50 year old kitchen” or “I want to restucco my home!”

The fantasy has changed.

My fantasy now consists of a paid off mortgage and growing mutual funds.

I can’t tell you how strange it was to sit down to deliberate over the next step. Obviously we are going to save a larger emergency fund and aggressively pay our second mortgage but my dreams of ‘big shiny things’ are fewer and farther between. OK, I’ll just spit it out…

I’m an addict.

I’m addicted to the good feeling I get when I see zero balances.

Have you thought about your life after debt? What are your plans (other than investments and mortgage payoffs)?