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Posts tagged with: car loan

New Debt and a New to Us Car

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I am going to sit down this weekend and put together a post on all my existing debt, I realize it is long overdue.  Unfortunately, I did have to accrue some new debt this past weekend.  I had to buy a car.

Back Story

About two years back, I got a great deal on a used car. We put miles on that car with all the back and forth between Virginia and Georgia over the past year, almost daily trips to the gym and now about 100 miles a day between my work commute and an hour drive one way to the gym…our used car served us well.  But about 7 weeks it died.  We have been making due with one car (my son’s 1996 Honda Accord) and borrowing a car (my Grandmother’s) one time a week when three of us had to be in different places.

The Search

I’ve spent the last 7 weeks trying to get by, and trying to determine the best plan moving forward and trying to save more money thinking I might could by a used car with cash. I have learned that I HATE car shopping and I hate the game of car shopping.

The Car

I settled on a 2011 Chevy Impala with 63K miles on it for $10K out the door (including everything, no other out of pocket costs.)  My uncle found it for me, knows the previous owner and made sure it was in good shape. It has new tires, new brakes and so on. Rather than cleaning out the emergency savings I have, I financed the entire $10K at 7% interest for 3 years.  My goal is to pay it off in 2.  I have scheduled payments of $400 a month automatically to start and will go up from there. (The required monthly payment is just at $308.) My uncle delivered it to me from Virginia and I am paying him back the $178 he paid for the tow trailer rental.

Conclusion

This is not the car of my dreams. It’s not one I would have even considered. But the price is right, it came with full service records, it’s a good size for our family while being reasonable on gas for all my driving and I am assured I can get 200K miles out of it if taken care of.  I spent a lot of time figuring out the best plan.

2011 Chevy Impala

Literally within the hour of driving away with this car this past Saturday, another tragedy struck our little family. More on that tomorrow.


WE DID IT!!!!!!!

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I thought we’d have to wait until the end of the month, but hubs’ month has started out on an upswing, which gave us the extra leeway to make the call.

Actually, I’d tried to call yesterday but I called at 3:40pm Arizona time (=5:40 EST), and they closed at 5:30pm EST. Rats!

But that didn’t dampen the mood any this morning when I called bright and early and made the request:

Customer Service: Thanks for calling PenFed, what can I do for you today?

Me: I WANT TO PAY OFF MY CAAAAAAAAAAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AHHHHHHHH!!!!!

I think the representative got a bit of a chuckle out of my excitement. He even gave me a hearty congratulations and “Wow, good job!” after looking at my payment history.

It takes 2 days to clear and then they’ll start the process of getting the title mailed out to me. He said it can take up to a month total. But that doesn’t stop the excitement from growing inside me.

IT’S MINE! IT’S MINE! THE CAR IS OFFICIALLY MINE!!!!!

Actually, this was our last consumer-related debt (only remaining debt is medical and student loans – see latest debt update here), so really EVERYTHING we own is officially ours!

No more monthly payments for furniture loans (see here), vehicle debt, or license fees (see here). Everything we own is OURS! Not a payment owed to anyone! No one can come and take anything from us.

It’s a glorious feeling, friends! So freeing! About 100 times better than I’d even expected!

Hubs had to work today so he wasn’t here to witness the actual moment of pay-off. But you can bet I did a happy dance around the living room and made the girls give me repeated High Fives all around!

I can’t stop smiling! It feels so, so, so good!

I know we still have a long way to go (I just want to acknowledge the obvious), but for today let me just soak up the feeling. Feels so freeing! If you’d asked me two years ago, not in my wildest dreams did I think I’d be sitting here today! In fact, my original goal was just to pay off our credit cards (a measly $10,000 compared to the over $50,000 we’ve paid in the past 2 years). Seriously – the power of this community is incredible! The support and the accountability it provides! I just. I can’t. I’m so happy!

Hugs and high fives all around! I feel like this is as much an accomplishment for YOU as it is for me. You’ve pushed me along and gotten me here, after all. For that, I’ll be eternally grateful!

Hope your Mondays are as INCREDIBLE as mine has been! : )


Just Sayin’…

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After sitting steady in the $15,000 owed range for my auto loan debt (as you can see, from February through April), it feels pretty awesome for these debt payments to have kicked into high gear in the past few months. Seeing the balance dip just below $7,000 = priceless! It’s going to be gone quickly now!

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Hope you’re all experiencing some fun wins, too! It definitely helps keep motivation high and the momentum rolling!

Happy Thursday!

 


The Next Step, Part II

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This is a follow up post to The Next Step. There was an over-whelming consensus that this should be my next debt tackled even though people didn’t agree on how.  So here is my plan…

Because I have eliminated all other consumer debt other than this car loan…I have two lines of credit open with no balance.  I called and asked if the introductory offer still stood that I used last December…any transferred balance 0% interest for 6 months.  Wonderful news…it does!

So I have transferred the balance of HIS car loan to my line of credit, effectively paying off the car and I should receive a clear title.  Yeah!

That gives me a balance of just at $3,000 at 0% for 6 months…$500 per month to pay it off with no new interest.  Seems like a good deal to me.  He will continue paying $246 per month to me until the balance is paid, but I will have cleared it off my credit by early 2016.

(We have also dealt with his moving the car out of state…after research done with the state’s DMV in question and insurance company.  All above board when that move actually happens which I have no ETA on that from him, but I’m prepared for when it does.)


Poof – Be Gone!

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Wow, it has been a loooooong time since I’ve paid off a balance in full! When I first started blogging I was knocking debts out left and right (and, to be fair, some of them were pretty small debts). But for the past several months I’ve just been chip-chip-chipping away at some of the bigger debts.

I’m so glad that I can finally report that I’ve knocked another couple of debts off my debt list! (See last debt update here)

First up on the chopping block, I’ve finally paid off the second of our 3 monthly medical bills. We started off 2014 with 3 separate monthly medical bills: $75/month, $50/month, and $25/month. First I knocked out the $75/month bill (this actually happened this past November 2014). This month I’ve officially paid the last of the bill for the $50/month payment! Wahooo!!!! This still leaves us the $25/month bill (which also happens to be the largest balance = $6136), but its interest free so I have no intention of paying anything extra to it until other high-interest debts are gone. Regardless, I’m excited to be rid of the $50/month payment, which represented our bill for a specialist (neurologist) from when husband had a mystery illness at the end of 2013. See ya later, Dr. Neuro man! Or no….hopefully we WON’T see you later! Enjoy the money, hope you’ve had a nice vacation on us! (I’m being cheeky, but we really are grateful for the doctor’s services, of course. Just glad this bill is finally gone after over a year of paying on it!).

Next up on the chopping block, my personal favorite (and hubs’ too)….we’ve finally paid off the last of our remaining license fees!!! We had ignored this debt for a long time, and even when payment plans were arranged, the initial amount due was over $10,000. At the time I was a grad student making $500 every other week, hubs didn’t make much more, and it felt like these fees would NEVER be paid off. Oh man, I could go on and on about all the things I WISH this money had been spent on, how foolish we were, etc. Suffice it to say the lesson has been learned many, many times over. These fines represent mistakes we will never repeat for the rest of our lives.

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This is just one of 2 pages of fees. Love seeing those zeros!

 Oh the euphoria of paying of these debts (but the license fees, in particular)!!!

Now we’re officially down to only 3 categories of debts: the remaining medical, the car loan, and (dun dun DUUUUUN) the monstrous student loan debt.

To this end, I have some news to share with you later today. Be sure to check back this afternoon!

Can I get a “Wahoo!!!!” for these paid off debts? Feels oh so good! What’s your latest debt to pay off? What was your most psychologically-pleasing debt to pay off?


The Car

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So I’m here for your advice today. We’ve had our van listed for sale for almost 4 months now, I believe, minus that month it was in the shop was being rear-ended. And while I’ve gotten a few inquiries, but nothing really solid. Then this week, I had a super low ball offer…like 33% less then what I’m asking…no thank you!

Being a commercial vehicle, it’s harder to place a value on it so I went to my bank and asked their help. They valued it at about $25K. I own right at $27K.

So here’s the question…do I continue to list it for sale and just keep on or do I explore downsizing to a used car and perhaps roll the portion I am “upside” down into a new auto loan? I’ve looked (just online) at used cars and I see two viable options:

5+ year older Honda Element
Plus: Price around $12K, great gas mileage, low maintenance
Down: Only seats 4, there are 5 of us. But we do have the ’96 Honda Accord that seats 5 and is paid off. History Buff will get his license in March. Would have to rent a vehicle for any longer distance driving, which we are certainly not doing alot of but it will happen on occassion.

4+ year older Honda Pilot
Plus: Good gas mileage (much better than current vehicle,) low maintenance based on reputation, 3 row seating so seats all of us and some extras when needed (which we actually have ALOT)
Bad: Price around $18K, and I HATE 3 row seating, it’s very inconvenient for getting in and out.

I’m certainly not rushing into any decision. And as mentioned on several occassions recently, I don’t really trust my judgment. So I’m asking for your opinions.

Just a refreshed on current vehicle situation.
Car #1: New, Financed, large commercial van that I purchased to accomodate our growing family. Currently financed $27K, insurance runs about $100 per month, taxes are about $400 per year, monthly payment is $696. Regular oil changes and tire rotations, no other maintenance expected for forseeable future.
Car #2: Older Honda Accord, in good shape, owned outright. Insurance about $20 per month and taxes will be around $50 year. Just got inspection and oil change, will need new tires and to recondition headlights in coming months but no other maintenance known. This will become the twins car as they get their licenses (starting in March.) Oh, and it is a stick shift which I have VERY limited experience with.

Ok, I think that gives you all relevant information. What do you advise?


How the Payment Box Allowed Me to Buy a Car

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By Darren Stevens

I thought my story might help some people who find themselves in a similar situation. I was recently able to get a car because of the payment box when I likely wouldn’t have been able to any other way. Getting that car was vitally important because it allowed me to keep my job, which in turn allows me to pay for my apartment and stay off the streets. It’s a rather long and complicated story, but I will give you the concise version to give you a bit of background.

I’ve been in and out of the hospital for some years now due to chronic illness. The illness has also led to me having huge medical bills and even filing for bankruptcy. Due to all of this, my credit isn’t what could be called close to being good. It’s terrible, and that makes it difficult for me to qualify for any credit or loan. That hasn’t been a problem because I went to an all-cash system that had been working well. That was until my employer decided to move locations which meant that I would no longer be able to take public transportation to work.

The only option I had was to get a car or lose my job. I was terrified because I thought there was no way I could qualify with my credit history. Then I remembered an article Tricia wrote about payment boxes when they first came out years ago. Since my choice was to have a job and a roof over my head or not, I immediately went searching to see if I could find something that could help me get a reliable used car that would get me to and from work each day.

For those not familiar, a payment box is a device that lenders place in the car that give them control of whether or not the car starts. , it allows lenders to disable your car so that it won’t run if you don’t make a payment that’s due. While this sounds like a terrible thing for the car owner, for me it was a lifesaver. That’s because the payment box gives the lender some control over getting payments, so they’re willing to give people like me who have terrible credit a loan when otherwise it wouldn’t be worth the risk.

By having control of the car, it mitigates their risk and allows them to easily disable the car. It won’t start if a payment is missed, and to recover the car (the device also has a GPS tracking system) if a missed payment isn’t immediately made. On my side, as long as I make the monthly payments on time, there is no issue, and I have a car that gets me to and from work. With these safeguards, they’re willing to make a loan to someone they might not normally approve. To qualify, I had to show my paycheck stubs to prove that I could make payments.

There are a lot of people who think that payment boxes are a bad idea. I read a survey conducted by Stoneacre that said the public is still evenly divided on whether or not this is a good idea. It said that 35 percent of people thought the payment box is a good idea, 34 percent thought it’s an invasion of privacy, and 31 percent had no specific view on it. My guess is that those who though it was a bad idea or an invasion of privacy have never been in a position where they couldn’t get a car they needed without this option.

I must admit that I would prefer not to have the box in my car. They claim they only use the GPS capabilities if they need to repossess the car, but that doesn’t mean the NSA doesn’t have access to it. I’d rather there not be a possibility of someone knowing where I am at any time. If, however, the choice is that or living on the streets because I can’t get to my job, I’ll gladly accept the conditions.

So you may be wondering why I’m writing this for BAD. I wanted people to know that not all people who have terrible credit are people who just racked up credit card debt and decided not to pay, or people who don’t understand how credit works. Not everyone who gets a bad credit car loan is someone who is lazy and didn’t have what it takes to organize their finances. Until I came down with my illness, I had great credit, and I’d never failed to pay a bill on time. When you get sick, and your choice is getting the medication you need to stay alive or paying a bill that has come due, priorities change pretty fast.

There are some of us who were thrust into the poor credit world because of the genes our parents gave us without ever intending to get anywhere near it. I hear from a lot of people who say that those with bad credit shouldn’t be able to get any credit because they have already shown they aren’t reliable, and they should live with the consequences of their prior choices. The truth is that there isn’t a one-size fits all designation as to why people have credit problems. And if the system didn’t find ways to try to help those who do have bad credit, I would probably be living under a bridge somewhere instead of having a job, paying taxes and being able to contribute to my community.


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